Archive, Product News

Volvo and Scania in AdBlue suppression warning

Two truck-making groups with strong environmental credentials have endorsed publically Truck Industry Council efforts against AdBlue suppression devices.

The Council, which represents original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), wants to block the import of the devices that alter the amount of the diesel exhaust fluid that enters the exhaust process to neutralise nitrogen oxide (NOx).

By Rob McKay | October 12, 2012

Two truck-making groups with strong environmental credentials have endorsed publically Truck Industry Council efforts against AdBlue suppression devices.

The Council, which represents original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), wants to block the import of the devices that alter the amount of the diesel exhaust fluid that enters the exhaust process to neutralise nitrogen oxide (NOx).

Both Volvo and Scania have highlighted legal and warranty issues relating to their use.

“Our response is very clear: it is simply illegal to change a vehicle from a condition of compliance with Australian Design Rules,” Mal Brown, Vice President, Group Truck Technology and product engineering for the Volvo Group in Australia, says.

“In addition to this, the Volvo Group has a commitment to environmental care, as a core value, and therefore we do not condone any device that reduces the effectiveness of the SCR [selective catalytic reduction] NOx reduction system.”

Scania also pointed to other possible consequences to engines of such devices.

“Scania does not condone the use of a product such as this,” a spokesman says.

“The system does not indicate how it may or may not affect the legal engine exhaust emission levels or the vehicle’s ability to comply with the emissions regulations.

“Engine warranty would be affected if such a system was fitted to Scania trucks.

“Engine performance and fuel economy would be affected and ECU [engine control unit] fault codes would more than likely be raised, which may affect engine and other truck systems, including driveline and equipment connected to the engine.

“We strongly advise customers not to tamper with the engine and associated systems, and not connect systems that have not been tested and approved by the OEM.”

Bookmark and Share

Previous ArticleNext Article
Send this to a friend