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Styles criticises previous government’s support for national regs

Northern Territory Transport Minister Peter Styles has criticised the previous government for signing up to national heavy vehicle regulations

December 4, 2013

Northern Territory Transport Minister Peter Styles has criticised the previous government for signing up to national heavy vehicle regulations.

The current government will not switch to the new regulatory framework when it takes effect on February 10 next year in Queensland, South Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.

The National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR) will take over the running of a new national fatigue management scheme, chain of responsibility law and permit applications in jurisdictions that have adopted national regulations.

“I am pleased that both the national rail and marine regulators are currently operating in the Territory. However, Delia Lawrie’s previous government was quick to sign up to the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator reform without any detail on the benefit to the Territory,” Styles says.

“Industry has also raised concerns about the national fatigue management regime, and as such, we will not participate in the scheme as there are no demonstrable benefits for the Territory.”

Styles cites the NHVR’s economic report that states the regulatory reforms could lead to a benefit of only $1.3 million over 22 years to the NT.

He says a national forum to be held in Alice Springs in May next year will bring the Territory’s transport issues to light.

The Remote and Regional Transport Infrastructure and Services Forum will coincide with a meeting of the country’s transport ministers.

Styles says he hopes the forum will place remote and regional transport issues on the national agenda.

He hopes the forum will be a key facilitator for all jurisdictions to make an input into the Federal Government’s white paper on developing northern Australia.

“We need to see the provision of basic transport services, similar to those that most of us take for granted in our day to day lives, such as registration and licencing services and public transport, which are most often non-existent in remote communities,” Styles says.

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