ALC and NFF hammer out key freight strategy priorities


Discussion to help in National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy development

ALC and NFF hammer out key freight strategy priorities
Michael Kilgariff says the meeting focused on infrastructure issues involved in getting produce from farms to cities and ports.

 

The Australian Logistics Council (ALC) and the National Farmers’ Federation (NFF) have discussed priority areas that need government action in a meeting today.

The outcome of the Sydney meeting aims to help shape contributions from both ALC and NFF towards the development of the National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy

ALC MD Michael Kilgariff says the two sides discussed critical infrastructure challenges in the way of Australia’s freight logistics and farming sectors, and regulatory changes and funding focus that can usher operational improvements.

"This meeting allowed ALC and the NFF to explore the key infrastructure issues involved in getting produce from the farm into our cities and ports," Kilgariff says.

"We know Australian households want to purchase the freshest possible produce when they do their shopping.

"We also know that Australia’s high-quality agricultural produce represents an enormous export opportunity.

"However, industry can only meet the expectations of domestic and international consumers if we have a safe and efficient supply chain.

"This requires governments to make the necessary regulatory improvements and infrastructure investments, including constructing major projects such as the Inland Rail linking the ports of Melbourne and Brisbane, with efficient linkages to the ports of Newcastle, Botany and Kembla."

With less than a fortnight until the Federal Budget is passed, the ALC says it was an "opportune moment" for the representative bodies to meet.

Both parties agree that today’s discussions will help ensure the National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy is relevant to the needs of the freight industry, farmers and consumers.

NFF CEO Tony Mahar says the farming industry is heavily reliant on the transport sector and therefore the two sides need to find common interests and discuss future infrastructure planning.

"Agriculture is an industry that competes on the global stage," Mahar says.

"In order to maintain and build our international competitiveness, strategic infrastructure investment is vital.

"Farmers are some of the best innovators in growing our produce, but only so much can be done on farm.

"Once our products leave the farm gate we are heavily reliant on our transport and infrastructure networks to reach consumers.

"Getting this right is fundamental, which is why we have had these discussions with ALC to identify where key productivity gains can be made."

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