Flinders Ports acquires Demag Crane


German-based port and industrial crane manufacturer Demag Cranes has delivered a Mobile Harbour Crane to Port of Adelaide in South Australia.

Flinders Ports acquires Demag Crane
Flinders Ports acquires Demag Crane


December 12, 2011

German-based port and industrial crane manufacturer Demag Cranes has delivered a Mobile Harbour Crane to Port of Adelaide in South Australia.

The Gottwald Model 6 crane will be used at the Port of Adelaide for the handling of iron ore and concentrates using the newly developed Rotainer spreader system.

The system involves open top containers full of ore being stored at the port until there is a sufficient quantity to fill a bulk ore carrier for shipping.

Containers are then lifted into the hold and rotated in a vertical plane to dump their load. The empty container is then returned to the dockside for removal.

"The new Gottwald crane is part of a logistical concept tailored to precisely meet the requirements of small to medium size mines," says Flinders Ports General Manager Logistics Andrew Pellizzari.

"We see great potential in this segment and, in future, would like to offer the Rotainer spreader system in other ports."

In addition to Rotainer spreader operation, the four-rope grab Model 6 variant, G HMK 6407 B, ensures that in the long term, it will also be possible to use the crane for traditional bulk handling.

With lifting capacities of up to 125 tonnes, a working radius of up to 51 metres and hoisting speeds of up to 120 metres a minute, Demag Cranes says the model guarantees maximum handling rates.

"For Flinders Ports, Model 6 in the four-rope grab variant is the ideal solution," says Demag Cranes Regional Director Asia Pacific Klaus Roehrig.

"Firstly to safeguard product handling as part of the new Rotainer spreader method. In this context, the Gottwald crane
will
contribute to the creation of a new business segment for Flinders Ports.

"Secondly, the four-rope grab affords the port the greatest possible degree of flexibility with a view to future conventional bulk-handling applications."

Initially, Flinders Ports only plans to operate using the Rotainer spreader system to maximise the export of product coming from the mines.

"Since these mines do not deliver large quantities at one go, the Rotainer method is ideal," says Roehrig.

"The containers filled with product are delivered by train to the port and stored there until there is a sufficient quantity for shipping.

"Then they are transported to the quay where the new crane takes over and loads them on to the ship."

Flinders Ports owns and operates seven ports in South Australia.

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