ATA partners for youth safety campaign


Young drivers told ‘Don’t Truck Around’ in ATA-supported safety campaign

ATA partners for youth safety campaign
The 'Don't Truck Around' campaign and others will be used to help further develop the exhibits in the ATA's Volvo Safety Truck

 

Three students at Victoria’s Swinburne University have urged their peers "Don’t Truck Around" as part of a new campaign supported by the Australian Trucking Association.

Students Caitlin Preyser, Charlotte Hicks and Grace Kirby designed the campaign as part of the Re:act behavioural change project, which is a part of the Communication Design course at the university.

Each year, the creative challenge centres around making 18-25 year olds consider their actions on the road, with the 2016 campaign focusing on mobile phone use and 2017 looking at driving the morning after drinking.

This year, the campaign aimed to encourage 18-25 year olds to interact safely with trucks while on the road – making them aware of the risks and urging them to change their behaviour where necessary.

Andrew Hardwich, the managing director of strategic creative agency Hard Edge that partnered with the ATA for the campaign, says he believes this was the first time a truck road safety campaign had been targeted to that age group.

"With the number of trucks on our roads expected to double in the next 20 years, the 2018 campaign is another significant step in improving road safety among inexperienced drivers," Hardwich says.

The ATA, which partnered with strategic creative agency Hard Edge for the campaign, said it would now translate the "Don’t Truck Around" message into a $6,000 campaign across the Hawthorn campus of Swinburne University during its second semester O Week.

Representatives from each of the top three finalists will also pitch their campaign at the ATA Trucking Australia 2018 conference on April 19, with all campaigns also being displayed at the event.

The ATA says it will use feedback from conference delegates as part of its work on the future direction of the safety exhibits in its Volvo ATA Safety Truck road safety campaign.

ATA safety and skills adviser Melissa Wells said this helped them gain insights into possible future directions for the safety exhibition.

"Not only has the Re:act project allowed us to engage with a young audience, but we have been able to gain insights into how they want to hear road safety messages and how they want us to communicate with them," she says.

 

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