Hydrogen fuel cell waste trucks boost


Alternative propulsion seen as key to council’s zero-emission operations

Hydrogen fuel cell waste trucks boost
Including waste trucks, Moreland City Council wants a zero-emission heavy vehicle fleet

 

Refuelling infrastructure that will help a northern Melbourne council run a new fleet of zero-emission heavy vehicles has received Victorian government funding.

Moreland City Council has linked with hydrogen utility company H2U and Iveco owner CNH Industrial (CNHI) in the project that aims to see 12 zero-emission waste collection vehicles operational by early 2020, in a transitionary phase.

Funding for the project has been provided through the second round of the Labor Government’s $20 million New Energy Jobs Fund.

The $9.37 million project will establish Australia’s first commercial-scale hydrogen refuelling station, which will produce hydrogen from 100 per cent renewable energy using an on-site solar plant and grid-sourced wind power.

In her second alternative propulsion project announcement in four weeks, after SEA Electric last month, energy and environment minister Lily D’Ambrosio hailed the scheme.

"We’re investing in new energy technology to reduce greenhouse emissions and create jobs," D’Ambrosio says.

"The station will initially power the council’s waste collection vehicles, with the long-term aim of including its entire heavy fleet.

"It’s a fantastic example of how the New Energy Jobs Fund is creating jobs and boosting renewable energy capabilities across Victoria."

Construction of the refuelling station is expected to start early next year.

The Fund offers grants of between $20,000 and $1 million to support projects that increase the uptake of renewable energy, reduce emissions, and assist community groups to develop their own projects.

Round two of the New Energy Jobs Fund provided more than $6.7 million in grants to 21 successful projects.

CNHI has partnered with H2U to develop and test a fleet of pre-production hydrogen fuel cell waste trucks.

"Funding under the Victorian Government’s New Energy Jobs Fund is an important milestone for our project," H2U CEO Dr Attilio Pigneri says.

"It provides us with significant support to progress project development, and importantly, it recognises and validates the twin goals of emission reduction and jobs creation that we share with our partners at Moreland City Council and across the H2U Consortium."

H2U is making inroads in its national strategy.

Last December, H2U was announced as part on a South Australian feasibility study for a hydrogen refuelling station at Mile End a part of a test of a Toyota Mirai and a Hyundai iX35 FCV,.

This was part of H2U’s plans to establish an initial network of 14 stations nationally.

Hyundai had by then already built a small hydrogen refuelling station in Sydney and Toyota has built a mobile refuelling unit that can be transported around the country.

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