RSRT releases interim report on waste management


The TWU's proposed RSRO includes many issues related to safety and fairness in the industry

RSRT releases interim report on waste management
The RSRT is inviting the industry to submit its comments on the interim report by March 18.

 

The Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal (RSRT) has released its interim report on the waste management sector following an official inquiry launched in February last year.

Tribunal president Jennifer Acton appointed RSRT members Steve Hutchins and Paul Ryan to conduct a formal investigation on the waste management sector’s practices under the RSRT’s third annual work program.

More than 340 industry stakeholders and operators were asked to make written and oral submissions on the issues, incentives, pressures and practices affecting safety and fairness in the in the waste management industry that could be improved by a road safety remuneration order (RSRO).

The Transport Workers’ Union of Australia (TWU) and the Victorian Transport Association (VTA) were among the parties who presented written submissions highlighting various issues related to safety and fairness in the industry.

The TWU’s proposed RSRO, which is, for most parts, in line with the RSRO proposed by the Waste Contractors & Recyclers Association of NSW (WCRA), includes many elements of the Road Transport and Distribution and Long Distance Operations Road Safety Remuneration Order 2014.

The highlights of TWU’s proposed RSRO include:

  • reiterate the Tribunal’s power to deal with a dispute under Part 4 of the Road Safety Remuneration Act;
  • ensure a driver is provided with a written employment or engagement contract;
  • set minimum vehicle maintenance standards;
  • require certain documents to be maintained for a minimum period of time;
  • ensure that waste drivers are trained to an appropriate standard;
  • mandate prospective tenders submit tenders that comply with the proposed RSRO and other relevant legislation;
  • require drug and alcohol policies are prepared and implemented;
  • ensure vehicles are maintained to specified standards; and
  • ensure waste drivers are paid in a way that achieves safety and fairness and accounts for all hours worked.

There are also a number of "differences and inconsistencies between the proposed RSROs, including provisions to recognise drivers’ accrued long service leave entitlements and preparing safe driving plans for the collection of waste", the report says.

The Tribunal is inviting the industry to submit its comments on the interim report by March 18.

The full report can be found here.

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