National heavy vehicle regulations delayed...again


The move to national heavy vehicle regulations has now been pushed back to September 1

National heavy vehicle regulations delayed...again
National regulations delayed…again
By Brad Gardner | May 20, 2013

The move to national heavy vehicle regulations has again been delayed, with transport ministers voting to postpone the reforms until September 1 this year.

Governments initially planned to have the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR) up and running across the country by January 1 this year, but the date was pushed back to July 1 to give the states and territories more time to implement the necessary legislation.

Ministers now believe more time is needed for jurisdictions to enact legislation and for authorities to complete the necessary training to enforce the new framework.

"They’re all progressing but I think there was a sense that a little more time to make sure everybody gets it through their parliaments would be a good thing," NHVR CEO Richard Hancock says.

Queensland is the only jurisdiction to have passed legislation enacting national regulations in the State, while Victoria, New South Wales and South Australia are currently going through the process. Western Australia has not signed up to national regulations.

"We also wanted to provide police with more time to be able to conduct all of the essential training and other preparations the police themselves have to do to be able to enforce the law," Hancock says.

He says the September 1 deadline gives the NHVR more time to conduct tests on a new IT system that will govern heavy vehicle access permits.

"I think everybody wants to make sure that when it goes live that everything is ready and that we’ve been able to do as much testing as we can in the timeframe."

The NHVR opened its doors in Brisbane in January and is currently responsible for Performance Based Standards (PBS) and the National Heavy Vehicle Accreditation Scheme (NHVAS).

From September, the NHVR will take over functions such as fatigue management, chain of responsibility and heavy vehicle access permits.

"One rule book under one regulator will cut costs and red tape for more than 50,000 specialised road freight businesses, as well as bus transport operators, across the country," Hancock says.

"Operators will see streamlined and practical operations and regulation for heavy vehicle access, accreditation and fatigue management, all matters that impact on the day-to-day business of heavy vehicle operators, large and small."


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