Companies have 'head in the sand' on COR


Survey results of transport and logistics sector shows companies still taking "head in the sand" approach to chain of responsibility

Companies have 'head in the sand' on COR
Companies have 'head in the sand' on COR
By Sean Muir | July 20, 2012

A survey of the transport and logistics sector shows companies are still taking a "head in the sand" approach to chain of responsibility.

Conducted by Chain of Responsibility Management Systems Australia, the survey shows 28 percent of people in the transport and logistics sector value safety as the highest priority when choosing a transport provider, while only 12 percent value compliance.

Chain of Responsibility Management Systems Australia, which runs training courses on chain of responsibility, says the survey results reflect well-known problems with safety in the transport industry.

"It gives a pretty good perspective on things and what is going on," Training Director Lee Kendall says.

"There are a lot of companies who keep their head in the sand on the chain of responsibility."

Kendall says it is important all companies have a speed management plan in place to ensure compliance with road rules.

"The plan should not be directed at the drivers because they have to comply with the normal road rules. Rather it needs to be directed at decision makers to stop pressures on drivers to speed," Kendall says.

The final survey results are expected to be released next week. Preliminary results show 20 percent of people value price as their highest priority, while 20 percent value communication.

Drawn from 406 transport and logistics professionals from across Australia, the survey reveals 8 percent value guarantees, 8 percent focus on speed and 4 percent are concerned with timing.

Results of a national Transport Workers' Union (TWU) survey of 715 drivers, released May this year, found 55 percent of drivers in the Coles supply chain admitted to feeling pressure to drive too fast, with the industry average at 26 percent.

Chain of responsibility laws require all parties in the supply chain to make sure their practices do not encourage drivers to speed.

Anyone who schedules the activities of a truck driver must take reasonable steps to ensure that the schedule does not cause them to speed.




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