Anderson rejects Operation Overland claims


Scott’s Transport CEO Peter Anderson has released a robust rebuttal of accusations from NSW authorities about how his business operates. In response to media coverage based on NSW Police information on Operation Overland, Anderson has described claims as “either inaccurate or highly confusing”.

By Rob McKay | March 14, 2012

Scott’s Transport CEO Peter Anderson has released a robust rebuttal of accusations from NSW authorities about how his business operates.

In response to media coverage based on NSW Police information on Operation Overland, Anderson has described claims as "either inaccurate or highly confusing".

Despite this, the firm will conduct an audit of its safety and compliance standards.

Stating that safety was the company’s highest priority, Anderson insists: "There are active processes and systems in place so that we meet our legislative compliance requirements; and we refute the perspective, number and depth of breaches that have been reported in the media."

Anderson says he knows of only two charges being laid against any of the company’s drivers as part of Operation Overland and that Scott’s has presented more than 100 vehicles for inspection.

"We absolutely do not tolerate speed tampering or excessive driver hours within our operations," he says.

"Again, contrary to some reports, only one truck - out of our 550 vehicles - is under suspicion for tampering with the speed limiter.

"Other alleged breaches have been of a minor nature or open to technical qualification or interpretation.

"The statistics being reported are not accurate."

Anderson is strong in his denial of union that big retailers put truck operators, such as Scott’s, under intense pressure.

"We are not put under pressure by retailers and our customers have a very responsible attitude towards road safety which is - at all times - shared by us," he says.

"We are a large and complex business and we are not perfect; however, we strive to be the best in this sort of business and I can proudly say that I think we have achieved that."

While the company had a "very good record in terms of driver speed", one of its drivers was caught last week driving at dangerously excessive speed on the Hume Highway at Mittagong.

The driver, who had been in the company’s employ for only one day, was immediately dismissed.

Anderson says that while Scott’s is cooperating openly with the various agencies interested in compliance issues, urgent clarification regarding certain claims made was being sought "to confirm the company’s good name".

Last Friday, NSW Police said "71 charges related to Operation Overland have been laid", though the use of the term "charges" appears open to interpretation.

"Offences identified, include: 18 speed-limiter tampering breaches, two overloading offences, 18 fatigue (log book) and 67 defect notices issued," police say.

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