Grain restrictions at Port Adelaide to be lifted


Viterra is set to start easing receivals restrictions affecting trucks at Port Adelaide tomorrow. <br /><br /> The agribusiness had yesterday flagged a 48-hour commodity and grade hiatus to avoid congestion at the port following delays in arrivals of ships servicing the state’s harvest. “Port Adelaide is primarily an export shipping terminal and as such our first priority is in meeting shipping requirements,” Viterra’s Executive Manager Grain Dean McQueen says.

By Rob McKay | November 17, 2011

Viterra is set to start easing receivals restrictions affecting trucks at Port Adelaide tomorrow, a spokeswoan says.

The agribusiness had yesterday flagged a 48-hour commodity and grade hiatus to avoid congestion at the port following delays in arrivals of ships servicing the state’s harvest.

Some trucks coming direct from farms
have had to wait up to five hours in the past two days, according to ABC radio yesterday.

"Port Adelaide is primarily an export shipping terminal and as such our first priority is in meeting shipping requirements," Viterra’s Executive Manager Grain Dean McQueen says.

"A large amount of grain has been consolidated from up-country sites to the Port Adelaide terminal in preparation for the large exporting program; however there have been delays to vessels, which has meant much of this grain has not been cleared from the port.

"In addition, the Port Adelaide terminal has attracted a large number of trucks from regional areas that have bypassed storage facilities to, instead, offload at the port.

"Viterra would encourage growers to deliver to sites in their local region during the temporary restriction and beyond."

In consultation with local silo committees, Viterra made the decision to consolidate grain from country sites to the port terminal to ensure the country sites were ready to receive this year’s grower deliveries, the company says.

"In preparation for harvest, we invested more than $12 million in infrastructure, road works, new equipment and amenities, at key sites across the state and we’d encourage growers to make full use of those sites," according to McQueen.

"Roseworthy, Bowmans, Tailem Bend and Loxton have all had upgrades prior to harvest and offer multiple segregations and have plenty of space available.

"We will extend the opening hours at Tailem Bend and Roseworthy to accommodate deliveries subject to weather conditions.

"In the meantime, it is extremely important we continue to facilitate export shipping as a priority for the benefit of growers, marketers and the industry."

A company spokeswoman says there is no congestion at present.

Many farmers in South Australia and Victoria have bypassed up-country silos to save on handling costs and freight rates that the South Australian Farmers Federation (SAFF) says have double in certain cases since the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) allowed Viterra bought ABB Grain in 2009 thereby forming a monopoly.

SAFF has been an implacable critic of the situation and believes state and federal regulators’ remits are not broad enough and SAFF Grain Industry Committee Deputy Chairman Philip Wilsdon tells ATN that nothing short of a breaking of the monopoly and the forming of competitive tension would do.

He says that apart from saving money, the positioning of up-country consolidation sites so close to the port gives farmers an added impetus to avoid them.

Tomorrow, the Port Adelaide terminal will have segregations for H2, APW1, ASW1, AGP1 and F1 for grower delivery, Viterra says.


Malt will be accepted by appointment on 08 8447 3089 and all other inquiries should go though the company’s service centre on 1800 018 205.

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