Transport and logistics talent in hot demand


Demand is hot for transport and logistics talent, with some firms acting pre-emptively to secure the right employee

October 6, 2011

Demand is hot for transport and logistics talent, according to the latest report from recruitment firm Hays, with some companies acting pre-emptively to secure the right employee.

In its latest quarterly report, Hays says there is high demand across Australia’s logistics sector for skilled workers, including engineers, transport analysts and solutions architects.

The report says supply chain analysts are being sought after as companies try to reduce costs, while import operators are also being courted.

"Import operators are needed due to our strong Australian dollar and the dramatic increase in imports, while transport operators with heavy haulage experience are sought," Hays says.

"In order to overcome the shortage of appropriate skills, employers are acting quickly when candidates become available, with some employers recruiting talented professionals before a need materialises."

Hays says some employers are also looking at transferable skills and developing staff internally to plug gaps.

"This is particularly noticeable within project freight forwarding," it says.

Hays says new jobs, particularly in freight forwarding, are being created and that businesses in transport and logistics are looking at increasing their headcount as the festive season approaches.

"In transport, we expect to see an increase in permanent and temporary positions fuelled by the Christmas build up. This will relate to both transport and international trade, with positions becoming available at all levels," it says.

Skills shortages have prompted employers to become more flexible, according to Hays, which says businesses are now focusing on broader skills rather than a certain level of experience when considering new applicants.

The shortage of top quality candidates in transport and logistics is expected to continue, with Hays saying companies are taking steps to lock their best and brightest in place.

"Candidate applications have fallen, and quality candidates are in short supply," it says.

"The skills shortage is most obvious for quality candidates at the $40,000 to $60,000 level, while immediately available warehousing candidates at the $60,000 to $100,000 are also in short supply."




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