Qantas Freight dodges industrial turbulence


Qantas expects a limited number of services to resume by mid-afternoon after Fair Work Australia (FWA) ruled early this morning that all industrial action by both airline and unions must cease. <br /><br /> And Qantas Freight appears to have avoided the worst of the recent disruptions. Both airline and unions now have 21 days to negotiate a settlement with an option for a further 21 days if progress is made.

Qantas Freight dodges industrial turbulence
Qantas Freight dodges industrial turbulence

By Rob McKay | October 31, 2011

Qantas expects a limited number of services to resume by mid-afternoon after Fair Work Australia (FWA) ruled early this morning that all industrial action by both airline and unions must cease.

And Qantas Freight appears to have avoided the worst of the recent disruptions.

Both airline and unions now have 21 days to negotiate a settlement with an option for a further 21 days if progress is made.

Industrial action banned during this time.

Qantas says it is waiting on a Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) green light before allowing planes to fly.

Both unions and the airline claimed gains from the ruling.

"This is a good outcome that will enable us to begin operating flights this afternoon on a limited schedule with the approval of the regulator, CASA," Qantas CEO Alan Joyce says.

Transport Workers Union (TWU) National Secretary Tony Sheldon says it is examining its legal position
in the next 48 hours to see if it should
appeal the FWA ruling.

He says there will be no further industrial action "if the company negotiates in good faith".

Qantas Freight cargo was being dealt with through Atlas Air, Jetstar and Express Freighters Australia.

Its priority will be on accommodating freight on hand and existing bookings, a source says.

Recent industrial action by Customs staff has had no appreciable effect on its operations, the source added.

The FWA ruling came after 14 hours of hearings over the weekend that came after Qantas grounded its entire fleet on Saturday, warning that it would lock out employees covered by industrial agreements involving the Australian Licenced Engineers Union (ALAEA), the TWU and the Australian and International Pilots Union (AIPA) on Monday unless industrial action ceased.

You can also follow our updates by joining our LinkedIn group or liking us on Facebook