Think again on truck emissions: Rocky's Own


Rocky's Own Transport urges government to rethink its approach to truck emissions after a report exposes shortfalls in emissions data

November 4, 2010

Governments are being urged to rethink their approach to truck emissions following the release of a report by Central Queensland University.

University researchers have exposed shortfalls in data being used in Australia on truck emissions.

The report shows the domestic freight task is characterised by long-haul and highway driving. However, information being used in Australia on truck emissions is based on the European freight task which is often short trips in heavy urban traffic.

Well-known Queensland operator Rocky’s Own Transport, which runs a fleet of 117 trucks, hopes to use the findings to lobby government for a more detailed study on Australian truck emissions.

"If we are going to collect data for a carbon trading scheme that's going to impact on our bottom line - when profit margins are already tight - at least let's plan to get the data right so we can plan for the long-term impact," Rocky's Own Chief Financial Officer John Bryant says.

The university worked with Rocky’s Own to analyse the emissions of the company, which must comply with the National Greenhouse Energy Reporting Scheme (NGERS).

Researchers developed a template for Rocky’s Own to help it calculate, report and reduce its emissions. They analysed the company’s fuel consumption practices, including different types of fuels and supply sources.

The detailed work improved Rocky’s Own reporting accuracy, helping it save around 3 percent on reported emissions compared with the default NGERS calculator provided to companies.

Businesses must report their emissions if they meet thresholds outlined under the NGERS. The scheme, which began in July 2008, is designed to inform climate change policy.


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