Job ads on the rise


New data shows total job advertisements on the internet and in newspapers increased by 0.7pc in September

Job ads on the rise
Job ads on the rise
October 5, 2010

Total job advertisements on the internet and in newspapers increased by 0.7 percent in September, according to the latest ANZ job advertisements series.

Newspaper job ads fell 1.9 percent while internet job ads rose 0.8 percent over the month (seasonally adjusted).

This is the fifth monthly increase in total job advertisements, with the total number of jobs rising to an average of 177,380 per week.

The series is now 32.9 percent higher than it was a year ago.

NEWSPAPER JOB ADS

The 1.9 percent fall in newspaper job ads in September was led by the Northern Territory (-10.8 percent MoM), Victoria (-6.2 percent MoM), South Australia (-3.5 percent MoM), New South Wales (-3.1 percent MoM) and Queensland (-1.8 percent MoM).

This was the first fall in three months and follows monthly rises of 1.4 percent in both July and August.

The fall in newspaper advertisements in September has seen yearly growth in this series ease to 6.7 percent.

INTERNET JOB ADS

The 0.8 percent rise in number of internet job advertisements in September is a deceleration from the 2.5 percent rise experienced in August and is the softest result since April.

However, internet job advertisements are still a strong 34.7 percent higher than they were a year ago.

ANZ Chief Economist Warren Hogan says while job advertising eased in September, the monthly rate of growth in trend terms (1.3 percent) is still more than double the 10-year average of 0.6 percent.

"This suggests that hiring intentions of Australian businesses are solid and that further falls in the unemployment rate are in prospect," Hogan says.

"We expect these positive employment intentions will translate into solid employment growth, of an average of 20,000 per month, in the short-term," he says.


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