Job ads rise 2.7pc in June


Internet advertising has driven a 2.7 percent increase in Australia's total number of job ads in June, says bank

Job ads rise 2.7pc in June
Job ads rise 2.7pc in June
July 5, 2010

The total number of jobs advertised in major metropolitan newspapers and on the internet rose by 2.7 percent in June to an average of 169,690 per week, new data reveals.

According to the ANZ Job Advertisements Series out today, the strong monthly rise followed an equally strong 2.7 percent increase in May job advertisements.

The series is now 32.2 percent higher than it was a year ago (seasonally adjusted).

INTERNET DRIVES REBOUND

Although job ads in general have posted a significant turnaround in recent months, results have differed between online and print material.

The number of job advertisements in major metropolitan newspapers fell by 1.6 percent in June following a sharp 4.4 percent decline in May (originally reported as a 6.5 percent drop).

Despite the monthly fall, newspaper job advertisements are 11.8 percent higher than they were a year ago.

Newspaper job advertisements declined across most states in June with the exception of Victoria and Tasmania.

The largest falls were recorded in South Australia (-9.1 percent MoM), the Northern Territory (-5 percent MoM) and Queensland (-4.7 percent MoM).

Meanwhile, the number of internet job advertisements rose by 3 percent in June.

Internet job advertisements are now 33.6 percent higher than they were a year ago and are growing at their fastest annual pace since January 2008.

EMPLOYERS ‘CONFIDENT’: ANZ

ANZ Chief Economist Warren Hogan says today’s numbers suggest employers remain confident about Australia’s economic prospects, despite escalating concerns about the global environment.

"That said, the recent strength in job advertisement numbers is not broadly-based. Similar to May, in June the rise in job advertisements was driven entirely by a 3 percent rise in internet advertising," Hogan says.

He says given newspaper advertising is more expensive than internet advertising, ANZ has observed at turning points, newspaper advertising tends to move before the internet.

"Hence, while the overall outlook still appears bright, the fall in newspaper job advertising in May and June does suggest that some businesses are adopting a more cautious stance."

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