Fuel imports boost trade at Port of Newcastle


Trade at Port of Newcastle set to boom this year on the back of fuel imports

Trade at the Port of Newcastle looks set to boom this financial year on the back of a rise in fuel imports.

Minister for Ports and Waterways Paul McLeay says key commodities including coal, grain, fuels and woodchips have led growth in throughput, but singled out fuel imports.

The increase created 273,782 tonnes of throughput for the period between July 2009 and March 2010.

McLeay says the growth is a result of BP’s decision to import fuels to Newcastle.

Last year the company spent $40 million upgrading its Carrington terminal and constructing new wharf facilities and pipeline from Dyke Berth to its storage terminal.

"Fuels are a new import for our port, while the grain results are another indication our farmers are recovering from the drought," he says

The port clocked 76.5 million tonnes of freight between July 2009 and March 2010, up significantly from the previous year of 72.6 million tonnes.

McLeay says the figure shows the economy is well on its way to recovery.

"These are very pleasing figures and it looks as though the Port of Newcastle is heading for a record 2009-10 financial year trade throughput of more than 100 million tonnes," he says.

"This is an excellent result for Newcastle and backs strong growth in the past nine months which have each been trade records for the port."

Coal imports are up 3.2 million tonnes from 72.14 million tonnes, grain increased by 602,668 tonnes, and woodchips climbed by 74,757 tonnes.

Trade throughput for 2008-09 was 95.84 million tones.


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