Business warned of return to labour shortages


Labour demand returns after slow 2009. Act now or risk missing out on skilled candidates, leading recruitment firm says

February 12, 2010

Companies that fail to quicken their recruiting processes risk missing out on quality candidates, a leading specialist recruiting firm warns.

Hays Logistics says vacancy activity is rising and the first signs of skills shortages since the global financial downturn have emerged.

While a slow 2009 may have allowed employers to taker their time recruiting, the firm claims the market is already verging on tight demand only one year on.

"Vacancy activity is expected to rise in the first two quarters of the year. But given the tumultuous past 12 to 18 months, employers are often very selective in the candidates considered and so take much longer to make a decision and present an offer," Hays’ senior regional director, Tim James, says.

"The first instances of multiple offers have already taken place, so those businesses that do not act quickly - particularly when recruiting in areas that are candidate-tight - are starting to miss out on the best quality candidates."

James says the key to attracting qualified candidates lies in employers showing flexibility and considering transferable skills to fill vacancies quickly.

"Employers can no longer expect a huge influx of quality candidates in response to roles that have rigid and lengthy criteria," James says.

"To help secure high calibre candidates, employers can reduce the interview to offer timeframe, and if possible conduct comprehensive one-stage interviews."

The Chairman of the Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council, Rob Adams, earlier this week said the transport industry needed to tap into the local labour market including the unemployed and underemployed.

Adams says the industry must also focus on creating an environment where truck driving is considered a long-term career that offers on-going training.



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