The last 600m: Border blocked by council access


Border Express pulls up 600m from customer, in latest example of councils blocking road access

The last 600m: Border blocked by council access
The last 600m: Border blocked by council access
By Tamara Whitsed and Michael House

Local road access issues have forced Albury-based carrier Border Express to pull up 600m short of its customer, despite successfully accrediting its trucks under the Intelligent Access Program (IAP).

The local Sydney council is refusing to allow the trucks on its roads, in another example of councils stymieing more productive trucks.

Seven Border Express trucks are equipped with IAP units from accredited operator Transtech Driven, which allows the vehicles to carry heavier loads along the Hume Freeway from Albury to Sydney.

But Bankstown City Council has prevented the heavier loads on its roads, leaving the Border Express trucks 600m short of its delivery destination, the Fairfax printing plant at Chullora in Sydney's west.

The mass concessions would allow the trucks to carry an extra reel of paper to the presses.

The Council is yet to respond to questions from ATN.

Transtech and other providers have previously hit out at councils blocking access despite state jurisdictions granting higher mass through the use of IAP.

Border Express Managing Director Grant Luff says the only benefit the company has received since investing in IAP is the ability to transport reels of news print from producer Norske Skog, just outside Albury, 13km to the Victorian border where it is then able to use the State's higher mass limits (HML) network to delivery them to Fairfax and News Limited.

But Luff tells ATN he remains optimistic on the future of IAP, which he says is laying the platform for paperless compliance.

Read the complete profile on Border Express in the August edition of ATN magazine, out next week.

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