Victoria Dock development improves port efficiency


New paperless container park opened in Melbourne, part of $80 million plan to improve intermodal freight efficiency

Victoria Dock development improves port efficiency
Victoria Dock development improves port efficiency

A new paperless container park in Melbourne promises to improve port efficiency and reduce road congestion.

Westgate Ports, a venture of Melbourne property mogul Sam Tarascio, officially opened the new Container Logistics Centre at Victoria Dock yesterday.

The facility is stage one of an $80 million redevelopment of the Victoria Dock site by Westgate Ports to create what Tarascio calls a one-stop-shop for all container-related and break-bulk services.

New berths are being constructed for break bulk and non-containerised shipping, while the container services will work in conjunction with existing facilities at nearby Swanson Dock run by stevedoring duopoly Patrick and DP World.

A longer-term plan will see new intermodal terminals built to the west and south-east of Melbourne to rail more containers out of the Port of Melbourne.

Tarascio sold his trucking and warehousing venture Westgate Logistics to Linfox last year, but retained the Victoria Dock interests.

The Container Logistics Centre includes a 17,500 square metre warehouse, a 50,000 square metre hardstand storage area and a separate 5,400 square metre warehouse with a dual-gauge rail terminal.

Tarascio calls it a 21st century facility.

"It represents the first stage of our long-term plan that will ease pressure on inner-city roads, improve safety and reduce carbon emissions and noise," he says.

Victorian Roads and Ports Minister Tim Pallas cut the ribbon on the centre, saying the site will serve freight forwarders, customs brokers and the general business community by speeding exports and imports and bringing social and cost benefits to the Victorian economy.

Tarascio claims the centre is the first of its kind to operate without paper across the whole supply chain from the port to the customer.

High productivity vehicles will be used to ferry up to six containers per truck to reduce the number of trucks on the road.

"Containers will be handled more quickly and more efficiently. By running off-peak, particularly at night, these vehicles will further reduce congestion on arterial roadways," Westgate Ports CEO Michael Haines.

Read more about the Victoria Dock development and Westgate Ports’ plans for intermodal efficiency in the December edition of ATN sister magazine SupplyChain Review.

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