IAP a 'win-win' for all, TCA claims


Australian Container Freight Services' take-up of the IAP is proof the monitoring system increases productivity, according to the TCA

Australian Container Freight Services’ (ACFS) take-up of the Intelligence Access Program (IAP) is proof the monitoring system increases productivity, according to the company administering it.

ACFS, which specialises in transporting containerised freight in Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne, operates super B-doubles on a confined road network in the Port Botany precinct under the Performance Based Standards scheme with the IAP.

By signing up to the IAP, ACFS is allowed to move two 40-foot containers per trip, as opposed to a standard B-double which can only carry one container this size.

According to the TCA, this capacity has the potential to deliver a 100 per cent increase in productivity for ACFS in situations where the freight task only requires the transport of 40-foot containers.

Despite constant delays in the process and scepticism by some in the industry as to how beneficial the IAP is, TCA TCA Chief Executive Chris Koniditsiotis says ACFS is an example of a transport operator using the IAP to deliver improvements to their business.

The super B-double’s additional length means it can carry an extra 20-foot container compared to a standard B-double, which is an increase from three 20-foot containers to four per trip.

"It’s very rewarding to begin to see transport operators taking advantage of the benefits the IAP can bring to their operation," Koniditsiotis says.

He says it also rewarding to see road authorities such as the NSW Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) using the IAP with the introduction of higher productivity vehicles.

"I have often used the term ‘win-win’ to describe the IAP and I think this is another great example of that," Koniditsiotis says.

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