Workplace Ombudsman to audit trucking companies

By: Jason Whittaker


Federal Workplace Ombudsman Nicholas Wilson will randomly audit road transport companies amid claims they are not complying with the Workplace

Federal Workplace Ombudsman Nicholas Wilson will randomly audit road transport companies amid claims they are not complying with the Workplace Relations Act.

Wilson will take the blowtorch to short distance trucking companies in Western Australia, Northern Territory, Tasmania, Queensland and metropolitan NSW. Wilson will focus on South Australia, Tasmania and regional NSW as part of an audit into long-distance haulage.

Wilson says his office, upon identifying the industry to be at high risk of non-compliance, has sent letters to more than 9500 businesses nationwide warning them of their obligations.

"The road transport industry has a significant number of vulnerable workers, such as those on traineeships and apprenticeships," Wilson says.

"We have received a significant number of claims and requests for information, so it is appropriate that we take this action."

The auditing process is to begin in August and run to October. In that time, the Workplace Ombudsman expect up to 700 will be randomly audited.

Inspectors will check minimum rates, minimum shifts, split shift provisions and allowances, payslips and time sheets. Wilson may also conduct follow-up audits 12 months after the initial campaign to ensure companies are still complying.

"With this targeted national campaign, we aim to ensure workers are receiving their minimum wages and entitlements," Wilson says.

Transport and storage ranks sixth on the list of industries with the highest levels of compliance problems, with 2535 claims over the past two years, according to the Ombudsman.

Public transport, such as school buses, will also be targeted along with couriers, tourist coaches, taxi trucks and furniture removalists.

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