ATA calls for expanded road network to offset registration hikes

By: Jason Whittaker


Governments must invest more money into road networks if the National Transport Commission’s (NTC) proposed registration hikes are passed, the

Governments must invest more money into road networks if the National Transport Commission’s (NTC) proposed registration hikes are passed, the Australian Trucking Association (ATA) argues.

As reported by ATN, transport operators, if the NTC’s proposals are passed, face a massive increase in registration fees, with B-triples set to hit more than $20,000 per year.

Transport ministers are expected to meet in February to vote on whether the proposals should be passed.

In light of this, the ATA has released a list of measures it wants implemented if the pass the NTC’s proposals are passed.

A briefing paper released by the ATA says it is important governments expand the B-triple network. The paper lists four routes, referred to "as matters of priority", which include expanding the Melbourne to Adelaide route along the Great Western and Dukes highways, the Melbourne to Brisbane route via the Newell Highway, as well as the route from Sydney to Adelaide via the Hume and Sturt highways.

The ATA also wants an expanded network for those travelling from Melbourne to Sydney via the Hume Highway, "including the Barton and Federal Highway links to Canberra".

The ATA has flagged the idea of expanding the Higher Mass Limits (HML) network, with a focus on NSW "given its geographic importance for the movement of interstate transport".

The briefing paper also calls for "increased road network access…for quad-axle groups in 19m semi-trailer combinations" and for the Performance Based Standards system (PBS) to classify acceptable travel routes.

The NTC’s proposed heavy vehicle enforcement fee of $66 million has also come under fire because "the enforcement costs provided by road agencies are not open to industry scrutiny, benchmarked to efficiency increases, or adjusted to take into account fines revenue".

Instead, the ATA wants transport ministers to endorse an accreditation program whereby operators "demonstrating industry best-practise pay less in registration and fuel charges".

Furthermore, it wants a transparent and accountable national system responsible for setting enforcement expenditure which will allow industry involvement.

You can also follow our updates by joining our LinkedIn group or liking us on Facebook